The Sleeves of The Prime Minister

Posted by on Sep 29, 2015 in Blogposts, Opinions | No Comments

“Tomorrow we roll up our sleeves and get to work,” said Prime Minister

Tsipras in his victory speech. That reminds me of what my father related that he and his friends used to say in university—“Beginning on Monday, we get serious.”

As Tsipras said that about getting to work, his cuff-linked sleeves were rolled up to well below the elbow. That is how I notice managers roll them, and anyone who is intent on looking stylish rather than on getting anything done. These are people who do not intend to work but who like to look as though they are working.

Tsipras certainly didn’t stay up late writing his victory speech. He said nothing in it that he hadn’t said before, either campaigning for the no vote in the referendum this summer, or in the election of January 25. Whatever the occasion, his speech is always the same.  We heard it in May and June 2012, and though it lacked substance even then, it could be justified by the fact that it was delivered by a new voice, speaking against the austerity policies which had demonstrably failed to bring Greece out of depression. Since then what happened? Tsipras did not strike down the German Goliath–we can’t fault him for that. And in the process, he showed his mettle, or lack of it, throwing his finance minister to the wolves, then signing a worse memorandum than the one he had vowed to reject.  Maybe we can’t hang him for that either, but why does he continually seek our approval?
He says we must roll up our sleeves and get to work. But does that include him?   In any case, he doesn’t roll his sleeves up very far.

Read the whole article entitled “Little Cheer in Syriza’s Victory” by Elias Kulukundis in Huffington Post here

Left side: Elias Kulukundis at age 3 with Onassis(Elias' personal archive) Right Side: Alexis Tsipras, photo by EUROKINISSI, efsyn.gr

Note how Onassis rolls his sleeves compared to PM Tsipras Left side: Elias Kulukundis at age 3 with Onassis(Elias’ personal archive)
Right Side: Alexis Tsipras, photo by EUROKINISSI, efsyn.gr